British English Holidays – St. George’s Day


hi everyone I’m Gina st. George’s Day is
on the 23rd of April and this is a special day in England because st.
George is a patron state of the country in this lesson you’re going to learn
about the meaning of st. George’s Day st. George is represented on the flag of
the United Kingdom what part of the flag comes from st. George we’ll show you the
answer at the end of this video although st. George is a patron saint of
England he is not English he was born in Turkey
in the 3rd century and was a Roman soldier he was a Christian serving under
a pagan Emperor and was persecuted for his beliefs by being tortured and
eventually beheaded Saint George is most famous for the legend of him slaying a
dragon the legend states that he travelled to Libya to save a princess
from being sacrificed to a dragon that was terrorizing a village this myth was
attributed to st. George in a 12th century so long after his death st.
George’s Day is not a big occasion in England it is not a public holiday and
any events that are held are usually small community events such as fairs or
parties you might see the cross of st. George displayed more frequently but
there are no big firework displays despite this the legends of st. George
and the infamous dragon is well known throughout England one of
most popular pub names in England is a George and Dragon the sign on these pubs
usually has a drawing of George slaying the dragon often in full medieval armor
and now I’ll give you the answer to the earlier quiz st. George is represented
on the flag of the United Kingdom but what part of the flag comes from st.
George it is the Red Cross in the middle this is st. George’s Cross and it also
makes up the flag of England how is this lesson did you learn something
interesting what are the origins of the design of your country’s flag leave us a
comment at English class 101.com and we’ll see you in the next lesson

17 Comments

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *